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Courses

Exploration of the scientific principles governing natural systems and their contribution to understanding the emergence and biological evolution of humans, the role of environment in shaping human behavioral and cultural variation, and the consequences of human activity on local, regional…

Students are introduced to the most famous archaeological sites in the world, with themes centered around the following: evidence of early humans, first cities, death and burial, art and architecture, ritual and religion, warfare, sacrifice, conflict, and great inventions.

An introduction to forensic anthropology, focusing on human identification through analysis of bone and teeth. Students learn the basic information used by forensic anthropologists to recognize and evaluate sex, age, stature, genetic origin, disease, and trauma. Human skeletal anatomy,…

Introduction to anthropological study of the biology and behavior of humans and the primates. Concepts of macro and microevolution, adaptation, cell and genetics, paleontology, human and primate origins, bioarchaeology and biomedical anthropology. Observational and hands-on activities are…

Biological anthropology is the study of human biological evolution and biocultural variation. In this course, students will learn about the interdependent relationships between the environment, human adaptation, health, and culture, including human-induced effects on the environment, as…

Exploration of the scientific principles governing natural systems and their contribution to understanding the emergence and biological evolution of humans, the role of environment in shaping human behavioral and cultural variation, and the consequences of human activity on local, regional…

Provides the basic foundations for conducting ethnographic fieldwork. Students will explore the unique strengths and utility of an ethnographic approach; learn how to conduct ethnographic techniques through hands-on, experiential learning activities; and apply these skills to a research…

Introduces students to the field of archaeology. Students will gain a basic understanding of the history of archaeology as a discipline, the nature of archaeological data, the core concepts and various methodologies used by archaeologists, and how archaeologists use anthropological…

Exploration and examination of the archaeological evidence for mankind's prehistoric experience in Central and Western Europe and the development of Celtic culture based on the archaeological support for these ideas. Paleoecological, climatological, and geo-biological models will also be…

Focusing on forced human displacements, this course explores the underlying causes of displacement, like conflict, persecution, political turmoil, and consequences of climate change, and organizations that provide essential services to asylum seekers in the U.S., Thailand, Austria, and…

Exploration of different theoretical approaches to the evolutionary study of human behavior, from Darwin through the development of ethology, sociobiology, human behavioral ecology, dual inheritance theory, and behavioral economics. Examination of topics such as influence of genes versus…

Provides a solid academic basis for the practice of cultural resource management (CRM) in North America and in a broader global context. The course will cover CRM from a conceptual standpoint; how current legislation affects CRM; and will integrate theoretical, practical, and ethical…

Supervised work experience with a natural history collection. Students will learn techniques and other procedures for curating materials in a collection of their choice under the direction of collection personnel. Non traditional format: Students will maintain regular, weekly work…

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains in archaeological contexts. The skeleton is a dynamic structure that responds to stressors in the natural and built environments, offering insights on health, human-environment interactions, and social processes in the past. This course covers…

Students will become informed users of the historical record of human resource use and of environmental change and stasis that is available from archaeological sites with emphasis on biological data from archaeological sites, the dynamic relationships between humans and their environments…

Two indigenous urban societies of the Americas, from farming village beginnings to the Spanish conquest, and their lasting impact on modern middle American culture. Topics include ecology, economy, political organization, urbanism, militarism, beliefs, art, architecture, and literature.…

An introduction to methods of biomolecular analysis in archaeology, including ancient DNA, stable isotopes, organic residues (proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates), and amino acids. The course will also cover applications such as dating, dietary and paleoenvironmental reconstruction, and…

The role of disease in the human experience. Students will draw on information from medical anthropology, epidemiology, human adaptation, disease ecology, and evolutionary biology to examine how diseases have been shaped by human-environmental interactions, culture, individual behavior,…

Through hands-on experience, students will be trained in different methods and techniques for conducting all phases of archaeological field and laboratory work, including surface survey, remote sensing, excavation, data and material recovery, recording, processing, and analysis. Students…

Archaeological geology examines the use of earth science methods and theories in the study of archaeological sites and their contents. The four major areas covered include: (1) the archaeological site and geology; (2) age determination techniques; (3) exploration techniques; (4) artifact…

The evolutionary history of the order Primates, a group of mammals that includes humans, apes, monkeys, and prosimians. Through the study of the fossil record, illuminated by the principles of modern evolutionary and ecological theory, we can reconstruct a broad outline of how primates…

Exploration of different theoretical approaches to the evolutionary study of human behavior, from Darwin through the development of ethology, sociobiology, human behavioral ecology, dual inheritance theory, and behavioral economics. Examination of topics such as influence of genes versus…

Provides a solid academic basis for the practice of cultural resource management (CRM) in North America and in a broader global context. The course will cover CRM from a conceptual standpoint; how current legislation affects CRM; and will integrate theoretical, practical, and ethical…

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains in archaeological contexts. The skeleton is a dynamic structure that responds to stressors in the natural and built environments, offering insights on health, human-environment interactions, and social processes in the past. This course covers…

Students will become informed users of the historical record of human resource use and of environmental change and stasis that is available from archaeological sites with emphasis on biological data from archaeological sites, the dynamic relationships between humans and their environments…

Two indigenous urban societies of the Americas, from farming village beginnings to the Spanish conquest, and their lasting impact on modern middle American culture. Topics include ecology, economy, political organization, urbanism, militarism, beliefs, art, architecture, and literature.…

An introduction to methods of biomolecular analysis in archaeology, including ancient DNA, stable isotopes, organic residues (proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates), and amino acids. The course will also cover applications such as dating, dietary and paleoenvironmental reconstruction, and…

Through hands-on experience, students will be trained in different methods and techniques for conducting all phases of archaeological field and laboratory work, including surface survey, remote sensing, excavation, data and material recovery, recording, processing, and analysis. Students…

Archaeological geology examines the use of earth science methods and theories in the study of archaeological sites and their contents. The four major areas covered include: (1) the archaeological site and geology; (2) age determination techniques; (3) exploration techniques; (4) artifact…

The evolutionary history of the order Primates, a group of mammals that includes humans, apes, monkeys, and prosimians. Through the study of the fossil record, illuminated by the principles of modern evolutionary and ecological theory, we can reconstruct a broad outline of how primates…

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