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Courses

Exploration of the scientific principles governing natural systems and their contribution to understanding the emergence and biological evolution of humans, the role of environment in shaping human behavioral and cultural variation, and the consequences of human activity on local, regional, and…

Students are introduced to the most famous archaeological sites in the world, with themes centered around the following: evidence of early humans, first cities, death and burial, art and architecture, ritual and religion, warfare, sacrifice, conflict, and great inventions.

Students will learn the art and science of asking and answering quantitative questions about the human condition, within and between cultures. In this class, we will turn numbers into meaningful data through the application of rational and critical thinking and basic mathematical skills. We will…

Exploration of the scientific principles governing natural systems and their contribution to understanding the emergence and biological evolution of humans, the role of environment in shaping human behavioral and cultural variation, and the consequences of human activity on local, regional, and…

The exploration of many facets of food, emphasizing culture, history, environment, and power. We begin with a foundation of human biology and nutrition, and then move on to the many complex economic, political, and cultural processes that relate to food. We end by exploring food movements and…

Provides the basic foundations for conducting ethnographic fieldwork. Students will explore the unique strengths and utility of an ethnographic approach; learn how to conduct ethnographic techniques through hands-on, experiential learning activities; and apply these skills to a research project…

The origins, causes, and consequences of warfare in human societies from the Paleolithic to the twenty-first century. Ethnographic, ethnohistoric, and archaeological data will be employed to evaluate the relationship between conflict and cultural change.

Introduces students to the field of archaeology. Students will gain a basic understanding of the history of archaeology as a discipline, the nature of archaeological data, the core concepts and various methodologies used by archaeologists, and how archaeologists use anthropological theories and…

Exploration and examination of the archaeological evidence for mankind's prehistoric experience in Central and Western Europe and the development of Celtic culture based on the archaeological support for these ideas. Paleoecological, climatological, and geo-biological models will also be used to…

Introduction to the cultures of South Asia. The topical area covers a vast geographical expanse, a large number of countries, cultures, ethnic groups, languages, religions, and an enormous body of anthropological literature. This course will focus on a select few cross-culturally relevant issues…

How health is shaped by beliefs, behaviors, and conditions in the United States. What is health and what does it mean to be healthy for different groups in the United States? In our examination of U.S. healthcare, we will begin with a discussion of how culture shapes health. We will then examine…

Provides a broad overview of the history of cultural anthropology, from its beginnings in the Enlightenment to the present. We combine two approaches in this course: (1) an intellectual history approach, and (2) an approach that examines particular ethnographic accounts as exemplars of various…

Students will learn about the social, cultural, economic, and political processes that have contributed to the evolution of cities in ancient and modern societies. Students will be able to identify and interpret similarities and differences in urbanization processes, urban features, and their…

Each semester the faculty, staff, and students of the Georgia Museum of Natural History welcome undergraduates as Natural History interns to enjoy a hands-on course with the Museum. Interns receive supervised experiential learning working directly with the faculty, staff, and other students…

The peoples of Africa and the process of researching and writing ethnography. Part one reviews classic/canonical ethnographic readings and concepts from the colonial period. Part two involves ethnography of colonialism. Part three details the post-colonial experience.

Human-environment interaction in anthropological perspective from the eighteenth century to the present.

The development of anthropological theory.

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